Thursday, September 12, 2019

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back Sheila Ingle

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back Sheila Ingle


Linda:  Welcome back to my blog. Thanks for joining me today. Your book Tales of a Cosmic Possum is a biography of your husband’s family. For those who haven’t visit before: why did you decide to write the book, and how did you come up with the title?

Sheila: When John and I were dating, he took me to visit some of his relatives in Union, SC. They were delightful and welcomed me to their family. As the years passed, he started telling me stories about his growing up in Ingle Holler. His grandfather and grandmother Ingle moved down from Tennessee to work in the cotton mills early in the 20th century. They left the Appalachia Mountains to make better lives for their family of eight, but they brought the mountain ways, folklore, and music with them.

My grandparents, on my mother’s side, were also from the mountains in North Carolina. I fell in love with books like Christy by Catherine Marshall and read it several times. The simple lifestyles of these people fascinated me. Their lives were hard, but their faith was stronger.

At family reunions, the women talked endlessly about those days of working in the mills and raising a family. As I listened to John’s retell similar stories through the years and went to many funerals of his parent’s generation, I realized that their narratives were being lost.

The mills closed. Some burned, and others were vandalized after the looms were shut down. Investors bought and refurbished in some cases, but, for the most part, weeds and weather suffocated the remnants.

Finally, it dawned on me that I had a walking-talking storyteller in my house, and his stories were part of our history. I started interviewing John, his brother, and his cousins. I was entertained and intrigued by his family and thought others might be, also. Choosing eight of the women as main characters, I wrote about their strengths to make something out of nothing, their favorite songs, jobs in the mills, and their love for their families.

Sharyn McCrumb is another favorite author of mine; she writes about Appalachia. In one of her books, she used the term. Then I found Jane Hicks’ poem “How We Became Cosmic Possums.” It describes a “first generation off the ridge or out of the holler.”  I realized I was married to a cosmic possum who had shared his tales with me for over 30 years. The title of the book was a totally accurate and personal description of the short stories.

LM: What is your favorite vignette from the book?

Sheila: Annie Mae Bobo was one of John’s aunts; she ran a boarding house during the Depression. She rented out four rooms with double occupancy and served three meals a day for $1 weekly. She took care of the bachelors who stayed there and worked in the cotton mills. Eggs, grits, bacon, and biscuits were served most mornings, and she packed a lunch for the men to take for lunch. Supper was another home cooked meal with more biscuits.

 One of her rules for living was “do right by the good Lord, hep yer own kin, hep others ye meet along the way.” And she lived this out by helping the many hobos that stopped by her house on the way to find work, making room for family when they visited, and being a strong support at her church, Green Street Methodist. I was fascinated by her stamina and her heart.

Researching about the hobos that crisscrossed our nation during this era opened my eyes to another part of our history. These men, women, and children begged for food, lodging, and work. Annie Mae always had a pot of Luzianne coffee on the back burner of her stove and something to eat to those who stopped at her house. The story goes that one morning she gave away her children’s breakfast to two hoboes and then had to cook more for her own.

When I met her the first time, she had long retired. She had baked a fresh coconut cake that morning and served it to us with coffee. Whether she knew company was coming to visit or not, she was always prepared.

About fifteen years before, John had lived with her for about a year after he was discharged from the Navy. She was a natural at “helping” others.

LM: In addition to Cosmic Possum you’ve written a series of fiction books about women during the Revolutionary War. How was the written/research process different for Cosmic Possum than the other books? The same?

Sheila: Researching the Revolutionary War in South Carolina was intense. Basically, I knew nothing, except from some historical fiction I had written. So I started from scratch. Besides reading, I th century. Reading biographies, poems, cook books, diaries, nonfiction, and fiction about the time helped give me a sense of the time. I also visited some of the battle sites we have here in SC and even spent eight weeks one summer working at the Cowpens National Battlefield.
attended reenactments and historical sites to get a sense of the time. I tried to immerse myself into the 17

Writing the Tales was quite different. I was more organized and intentional with what I was doing. I knew I wanted to describe one day in one woman’s life and decided to include one song/hymn that was special to her. Other than that, I depended on interviewing the family about what they remembered. I asked many questions, took notes, and asked more questions. I guess John is the storyteller for his generation; he seemed to remember more than the others. Since the family loved the Grand Ole Opry and listened to it on a weekly basis, I did research on it. Also, I had to learn about how the mill workers turned a bale of hay into cloth. We have a cotton museum in the lower part of the state that I visited to get a visual of this process.

Again, life in a cotton mill village was a part of our history that I knew little about, but I did know many of the people and had visited with them. The short stories cover life between 1904-1949. Since a lot was happening in our country during those years, it was easy to include facts about how life was then.

LM: What drew you to the Revolutionary War time period?

Sheila: I was and am a member of four lineage societies, and the first one I joined was the Daughters of the American Revolution. One of my Revolutionary War ancestors, Thomas Davis, fought and was taken captive in the SC Battle of Waxhaws. The Southern Campaign was fought mainly in SC with Francis Marion, Andrew Pickens, and Thomas Sumter leading the militia. The manor house of the Charles and Mary Moore house, built in 1760, is on the other side of town from us. It was a visit to this home called Walnut Grove that started this journey of writing about SC heroines. I have always loved history and enjoy walking where it happened. The protagonist of my first Revolutionary War book lived there. At age 55, all suddenly worked together to lead me toward that time in our history.

LM: What is the quirkiest thing you’ve ever done?

Sheila: Oh, Linda, that is funny. I am so not quirky! Probably too predictable and boring. I did throw a cooking pot at the wall one time, because I was angry at my mother for something she had said. It had water in it and is still a bit bent. It surprised both John and me that I literally “flew off the handle.” Laughter at my strange behavior was my response to what I did. (That took some resurrecting in my mind. I do know I have never thrown another pot, but I wonder what else I have forgotten!)

LM: Here are some quickies:
Sheila:
Mountains or Ocean for a vacation: I have never gotten over the love of the ocean. Daddy and Mother took us to Litchfield for a week every year, and the beach is still my go-to place for a deep breath.
Sweet or Salty for a snack: Love trail mix, because it has both.
Coffee or tea as your “go-to” drink: Coffee, please.
Summer, Spring, Winter or Fall as your favorite season: Spring and its flowers make me smile

LM: What is your next project?

Sheila: I have started writing a book about a Huguenot woman who emigrated to Carolina in 1685. From a blog post I wrote on her last year, I ended up being asked to speak about her at two events. Then I saw the original letter, written in French, that she wrote her brother in Germany in 1698 in a SC museum, and she captured me. Once again, I am pursuing a new century that includes the Three Musketeers, the Sun King, a voyage across the Atlantic in a small ship, and the very beginning of my birthplace, Charleston, SC.

LM: Where can folks find you on the web?

Sheila: 
Twitter: @sheilaingle1
Facebook: Sheila Ingle, Author

Thank you, Linda, for asking me to put on my thinking cap for a while this afternoon. 😊


About Tales of a Cosmic Possum:
Sheila Ingle's husband John was brought up in Ingle Holler in Union, South Carolina with eight other Ingle families. They worked together in the mills, shared their gardens, attended church, and enjoyed the playing and singing of the songs from the Grand Old Opry, When five of the brothers went off to war, those who couldn't fight took care o their families. The Ingles stuck together, just like they were taught in the Appalachian Hills of Erwin, Tennessee.

Love of God, love of family, and love of country were modeled in each home. In face, one year Make Ingle put his sons and grandsons together to build Hillside Baptist Church. Adults kept up with the newspapers and the radios; world happenings were important. Any type of sickness brought a barrage of soup and cornbread, because children sill had to eat.

On those twenty acres, the children played in the creek, cowboys and Indians, and hide-and-seek. They build their own wagons and sleds to race down the hill on the dry, hickory leaves. All the boys learned to shoot a .22 caliber, and John's mother Lois could light a match with her shots.

Living in Ingle Holler was home, where each one was accepted.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2HTQhbb

Wednesday, September 11, 2019

Wartime Wednesday: Baked Macédoine


Wartime Wednesday: Baked Macédoine


With rationing and the scarcity of meat during WWII, home cooks had to get creative to provide filling and nutritious meals. Vegetables were generally plentiful, but finding proteins could be challenging. As a result, eggs, cheese, and legumes (beans) were often substituted for chicken and beef.

A macédoine is a fancy term for vegetables (such as carrots and turnips) diced small or cut small (such as green beans) and mixed with peas. The vegetables are typically cooked separately in salted water, then drained before being combined at the end in a mayonnaise dressing.

This recipe from Better Meals in Wartime puts a twist on the concoction by baking it in cheese. Easy, quick, and delicious.

1 ½ C boiled rice
1 hard-boiled egg, chopped
2 C canned or fresh stewed tomatoes
1 C cooked corn
3 T margarine (remember butter was tough to find!)
1 T chopped onion
2 T flour
1 T chopped parsley
½ C grated cheese
2 t salt
1/8 t pepper
1 t Worcestershire sauce

Melt margarine, add onion and cook three minutes. Add flour and mix well. Add tomatoes and stir until mixture thickens slightly. Add corn, rice, egg, and seasonings .Place in greased baking dish, sprinkle cheese on top and bake at 400 degrees for 20 minutes. Peas, lima beans, and/or carrots may be substituted for corn or any combination of cooked vegetables.

____________________________

With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.


Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2PX1qPc

Monday, September 9, 2019

Mystery Monday: Who Betrayed Anne Frank?


Mystery Monday: Who Betrayed Anne Frank?


The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank is perhaps one of the most well-known and widely-read books in the world. Only thirteen years old when she was forced into hiding with her family in July 1942. A little more than two years later, the family was discovered and captured by the Gestapo. Tragically, only Anne’s father Otto survived the camps.

How the police learned of the Jews concealed behind the bookcase has been a mystery, and over the years dozens of theories have been put forward, but none have been proven conclusive.

One suspect is a man name Tonny Ahlers, a business associate of Otto’s and a member of the Dutch Nazi Party, reportedly highly anti-Semitic. According to the man’s son, Tonny found a letter from Otto Frank outlining his doubts over a German victory. Holding the correspondence over Otto’s head, he blackmailed Anne’s father until he refused to pay.

After the war, Otto indicated that a warehouse employee named Willem van Maaren was the guilty party, who was later subjected to multiple investigations related to betrayal. Another suspected warehouse employee was Lena Hartog-van Bladeren. Nelly Voskuijl, sister to one of the Frank’s helpers has also been brought forward as a possible suspect. A known collaborator who had relationships with many German soldiers, Nelly is thought to have been aware of her family’s involvement in hiding Jews.

A large percentage of historians feel the family’s discovery was purely accidental. That the group of police who found the fugitives weren’t normally responsible for finding hidden Jews, but rather investigating cases involving money. It is supposed that the police were checking reports of illegal employment and fake food ration cards, and stumbled upon the Franks.

A book published in 2018 has brought the latest theory forward, that of a Jewish woman who was executed after the war for collaboration with the Nazis. The author, Gerard Kremer, is the son of a member of the Dutch resistance of the same name. He claims that his father overheard Ans van Dijk speaking in Nazi offices about the location of where the Franks were located. That same week the Franks were arrested, however van Dijk was away in the Hague.

To date, none of the individuals identified have ever proven as the real culprit.

__________________________________

With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.


Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2PX1qPc

Thursday, September 5, 2019

Talkshow Thursday: A Guest Post by Gail Kittleson


 The Greatest Gifts

When you feel you can never lift your head again, what means the most? When you’re so anxious your heartbeat sounds in your ears or when your pain seems unbearable, where do you turn?

Educator and author Parker Palmer shares his experience from the darkest days of clinical depression when a friend simply massaged his feet. Few or no words were spoken. That presence meant the world, and he said, "...somehow he found the one place in my body where I could feel a sense of connection with another person, relieving my awful sense of isolation while bearing silent witness to my condition. ... He was present—simply and fully present.... We have something better [than fixing another person]: our gift of self in the form of personal presence and attention, the kind that invites the other's soul to show up."
 

This gift of presence cannot be surpassed, and giving this gift provides satisfaction like no other. We know we’ve truly been there for someone and become better for it. We have seen into another’s heart . . . into their soul.

The besieged doctors and nurses moving with field and evacuation hospitals through World War II offered this gift. Often, they performed life-giving procedures that saved lives. In many other instances, they could only administer pain-killing drugs to ease a soldier’s agony.

But in both cases, they gave the precious gift of presence. It’s impossible to imagine what this meant to the wounded or those breathing their last. For family waiting back home, knowing their loved one sacrificed his life was a bitter pill: to think that someone stayed with him, touched him, heard his final words—what earthly value can we attach to this gift?

That’s the thing—it’s not an earthly value. These very spiritual actions made all the difference in the world…this world and the next. Dedicated nurses and docs supplied this gift, along with citizens all over the world tasked with keeping their communities safe throughout the war.

Police forces, emergency crews, volunteer workers, the clergy—they gave beyond their powers, over and over and over. I stand in awe of their sacrifices. As Until Then came together, entering into their worlds produced tears.

How did these ordinary people make it through the sheer misery of war? What part did faith play? How much did they doubt along the way? And what lasting consequences accompanied them the rest of their lives? Finally, how can we best honor them?

So many unanswered questions—but exploring them gives meaning to the gifts they gave.
Someone recently asked me why I write what I write, and it’s all about using the gifts I have to highlight their steadfast service. It’s about increasing awareness and appreciation. It’s about what really matters in the long run.

About Gail Kittleson: Since the World War II bug bit Gail, she’s never been quite the same. Her husband shares her delight in visiting historical sites. They also enjoy their grandchildren and gardening. Gail’s goal is to increase appreciation for veterans’ tremendous sacrifices and honor those who gave so much for the cause of freedom. 

About Until Then: 
March 3, 1943
Bethnal Green, London's East End

Shortly after a quarter past eight, a siren split the air. Marian Williams lifted her sleeping daughter from her bed and darted down stairs Her mother and father-in-law, off on air warden duty, had left the front door unlocked.

She hugged her youngest child close. The blackout made the going difficult, by her husband's instructions echoed in her brain: "Whatever you do, get down inside the station fast as you can."

She hoped for a spot near the canteen, with access to milk. Uneven light shone over the paved steps. Then she tripped. Her kneed hit the concrete, then something bashed her left side. Someone cried out. Another blow scraped her arm on the landing floor. Where was her baby? She attempted to get up, but an even heavier weight slammed her face down. A crushing burden descended, then all went black.

Riding in the backs of Army trucks across North Africa, throughout the Sicily campaign, up the boot of Italy, and northward through France into Germany, Dorothy Woebbeking served as a surgical nurse with the 11th Evacuation Hospital.

During World War II, US Army nurses worked and slept in tents through horrific weather, endured enemy fire, and even the disdain of their own superior officers who believed women had no place in war. But Dorothy and her comrades persevered, and their skills and upbeat attitude made a huge difference in the lives of thousands of wounded soldiers.

Dorothy and Marian's stories converge on a simple, hand-stitched handkerchief.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2ZJhe7I

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Wartime Wednesday: Barrage Balloons


Wartime Wednesday: Barrage Balloons


Simply put, a barrage balloon is a bag filled with lighter-than-air gas attached to a steel cable anchored to the ground. A winch is used to raise or lower the balloon in an effort to deny low-level airspace to enemy aircraft in three ways:

  • Forced aircraft to higher altitudes, decreasing surprise and bombing accuracy
  • Enhancing ground-based air defenses and the ability of fighters to acquire targets
  • Presenting a mental and material hazard to pilots


Barrage balloons were used extensively in England (especially London) during WWII. By the middle of 1940, there were over 1,400 balloons, a third of them over the capital. Would you be surprised to discover that these balloons were also used in the United States?

During the summer of 1941, British officers warned Americans that Nazi planes could fly at 20,000 feet and reach the US mainland within twelve hours. In response, the Navy created two Barrage Balloon squadrons, both of which were trained at Camp Tyson in Paris, Tennessee. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US implemented an extensive balloon defense in areas such as San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles, and Seattle on the west coast and Norfolk, Pensacola, and New York City on the east coast. Vital facilities in the Great Lakes were also shielded.

Severe storms in August and October 1942 caused some of the balloons to break loose, trailing cables that short circuited power lines. Some rouge balloons escaped capture for extended periods such as the Fort Drum balloon that evaded officials for more than a week. Following the incidents, new procedures were put into place which included stowing the balloons during winter months, regular deployment exercises, and a standby team to deploy balloons in case of attack.

___________________________

With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.

Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2LgKkrc

Tuesday, September 3, 2019

Traveling Tuesday: Tennessee’s Wartime Service


Traveling Tuesday: Tennessee’s Wartime Service


Tennessee is a beautiful state, long and narrow, and referred to in three segments: East, Middle, and West. Eight states border the state which features six physiographic regions: the Blue Ridge, the Appalachian Ridge and Valley, the Cumberland Plateau, the Highland Rim, the Nashville Basin, and the Gulf Coastal Plain. In addition, Tennessee is home to over 10,000 documented caves, the most in the United States.

It is this varied geography that allowed Tennessee to serve in various ways during WWII. Over 300,000 men from the state served in the armed forces (six of whom received the highest award for valor, the Congressional Medal of Honor).

Interestingly, Governor Prentice Cooper visited Europe in 1937 and became convinced that if hostilities broke out, the US would ultimate be involved. As a result, he came home and developed the infrastructure for military bases, training, and war-related industries. In 1940, Tennessee established the Advisory Committee on Preparedness, the first defense organization in the country.

More than 280,000 residents worked in war manufacturing around the state. Oak Ridge grew out of the Manhattan Project and produced vital components of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima. There were several prisoner of war camps that housed approximately 68,000 Germans, Austrians, and Italians.

Because of its highly rural nature and terrain similar to that of Western Europe, Middle Tennessee was chosen as the location of the first of a series of military maneuvers that featured the combined forces of tanks and infantry. In these maneuvers, General George Patton refined his tactics for the use of tanks as “red” and “blue” armies faced each other in complex and realistic training exercises. It is estimated that over 850,000 men and women participated. Based at Cumberland University in Lebanon, the “Tennessee Maneuvers” officially took place “somewhere in Tennessee.”

___________________________

Love’s Allegiance: With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.

Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2LgKkrc

Thursday, August 29, 2019

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back, Amy Anguish


Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back, Amy Anguish

Linda:  Welcome back and congratulations on your latest release, Faith and Hope. What was your inspiration for the story?

Amy: This story started from a simple question. What would happen if two grown sisters who didn’t get along were forced to spend the summer together?

LM: What a loaded question. Sounds intriguing! You recently returned from a writer’s retreat. How did that impact you and your writing?

Amy: This was my second year to attend, and I am planning to go every year from now on. It’s amazing to be surrounded by other authors whose brains work similar to yours. The setting was gorgeous, too, which left us all relaxed. And it actually inspired me to write a novel this summer that I hadn’t planned on for a while.

LM: In addition to being an author, you are a wife and mother. How do you juggle all your responsibilities?

Amy: Sometimes it’s easier than others. I’m blessed in that my children still nap most days, which gives me several hours in the afternoons to work. I also have a husband who is understanding and knows sometimes I will work in the evening, too. And he’s a teacher, so he is home more often than a lot of other jobs would make him. That helps, too. And I try to stick with a schedule most days, because that keeps things from overwhelming me.

LM: What do you do to prepare yourself for writing? For example do you listen to music or set up in a specific place?

Amy: I don’t really do anything except sit in my chair and open my laptop to wherever I left off the day before. I guess the most preparation I do, is that I think about my story as I try to fall asleep at night so I can have a better idea of where I want the next scene to go when I can write the next day.

LM: What is the quirkiest thing you’ve ever done?

Amy: Put pink streaks in my hair.

LM: Here are some quickies:

Favorite season: Fall
Favorite Bible verse: Isaiah 3:5-6
Favorite Actor or Actress: Audrey Hepburn and Carey Grant

LM: What is your next project?

Amy: I’m editing a couple of stories now with hopes of getting them sent to publishers before the end of the year to try and get them contracted. I have another one contracted to come out next September. And I’m going to try my hand at writing a Christmas romance during Nanowrimo in November. That sounds like quite a bit, doesn’t it?

LM: Where can folks find you on the web?

Amy: My website is http://abitofanguish.weebly.com and my Facebook page is http://facebook.com/amyanguishauthor. I’m doing some fun things on there right now so definitely come check it out!

About Faith and Hope:
Two sisters. One summer. Multiple problems.


Younger sister Hope has lost her job, her car, and her boyfriend all in one day. Her well-laid plans for life have gone sideways, as has her hope in God.

Older sister Faith is finally getting her dream-come-true after years of struggles and prayers. But when her mom talks her into letting Hope move in for the summer, will the stress turn her dream into a nightmare? Is her faith in God strong enough to handle everything?

For two sisters who haven't gotten along in years, this summer together could be a disaster ... or it could lead them to a closer relationship with each other and God. 

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/31RhrHv

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Wartime Wednesday: Lemon Refrigerator Pie


Wartime Wednesday:  Lemon Refrigerator Pie

I love to bake, but my schedule doesn’t always allow me to indulge. The recipe below is a “no-bake” pie, cutting down on preparation time. I found it in my Better Meals in Wartime cookbook. Surprisingly, it uses three (3) eggs which sometimes were difficult to find unless you lived on a farm. It’s easy and delicious. Enjoy!

11 Graham crackers
3 eggs
1 can sweetened condensed milk
Juice of 3 lemons
Grated rind of 3 lemons
2 Tablespoons confectioner’s sugar

Great a large pie plate. Place the crackers on the bottom and fill the sides and spaces with broken pieces and crumbs, bringing them well up to the edge of the pie plate.

Separate yokes and whites of eggs. Beat the yolks well and add the milk, juice and rind. Pour mixture into the pie plate.

Beat the whites until stiff and fold into sugar. Spread lightly over the pie. Place under the broiler for 2-3 minutes to lightly brown the “meringue.” Put pie in refrigerator and chill for at leave five hours.

__________________________


Love's Allegiance: Now available!


With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.

Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?


Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.


Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2KCMyke

Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Wartime Wednesday: Florida Slaw for Six


Wartime Wednesday: Florida Slaw for Six


With the “dog days of summer” upon us, the thought of turning on the stove or the oven is probably not your idea of a good time. Next week, I’ll be posting a no-bake dessert, but this week I’m sharing a side dish that is a great accompaniment to just about any entrĂ©e. I’m visiting my dad who lives in Florida, so I was pleased when I found this recipe.

Did you know the word cole slaw comes from the Dutch “koolsla” meaning cabbage salad? The anglicization of the word came as far back as the middle of the 18th century. According to Wikipedia, the original recipe was found in a 1770 Dutch cookbook whose author gives credit to his landlady. Too bad we didn't get her name!

As I read the recipe name, I wondered what made this particular dish Floridian, so I did a bit of poking around. The recipes I found claiming to be Florida slaw were nothing like the one below and most included lime juice (a nod to its tropical climate, I suppose), so perhaps the origins of  this “old time favorite” as my cookbook Better Meals in Wartime touts will remain a mystery unless one of you can shed some light! Meanwhile, enjoy!

4 Cups cabbage, shredded fine
½ green pepper, minced
¼ Cup minced sweet pickle
1 Tablespoon mustard
¼ Cup vinegar
½ Cup thin cream
1 Tablespoon sugar
½ teaspoon salt
Shake of pepper

Mix the cabbage with the green pepper and pickles. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over cabbage. Toss slaw thoroughly and chill. Serve “as is” or with lettuce lining the salad bowl.

______________________________

Love’s Allegiance:

With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.

Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2KCMyke


Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Traveling Tuesday: Florida and WWII


Traveling Tuesday: Florida and WWII


I’m visiting my dad this week, so I thought it would be fun to delve into Florida’s association with WWII.

Like many other U.S. states, Florida sprang into action immediately after the attack at Pearl Harbor. Thousands of young men rushed to enlist. As uniformed service became available to women, they signed up too. Eventually, over 250,000 Floridians would serve.

It wasn’t long before the military showed up in force. Because of Florida’s warm climate and vast amounts of vacant land, it was an ideal location for military bases. The number of military installations increased from eight to 175! At 180,000 acres, Camp Blanding became the state’s fourth largest city and housed 55,000 soldiers. Naval stations were reactivated in Key West, Tampa, Valparaiso, and Pensacola. In addition, there were forty airfields that trained pilots and crews, including one in Pensacola where Jimmy Doolittle and his crew trained for their dramatic raid on Japan.

Overcrowding on the bases became a problem, so the military took over hotels and resorts for housing and in some cases, hospitals. With the tourism industry at a crawl during the war, perhaps the facilities were glad to have the business. Three years into the war, Florida became a popular destination for soldiers on furlough.

Shipyards in Tampa, Panama City, Pensacoloa, and Jacksonville produced Liberty ships, and in Dunnedin, amphibious vehicles were designed and manufactured. Even landlocked Orlando built 9,000 assault boats. At one point, Florida considered changing its nickname from The Sunshine State to The Steel State. The citrus industry boomed and surpassed California in production for the first time during the crop year of 1942-43. Shortly thereafter, citrus growers patented the process to make concentrated orange juice. The U.S. Department of Agriculture authorized the temporary importation of 75,000 Bahamians and Jamaicans to work in south Florida fields.

In the early days of the war more than twenty-four ships were sunk off Florida’s Atlantic and Gulf coasts, so the “Mosquito Fleet” (the fast wooden PT boats used by the Navy) was created to patrol Florida’s coastline to help eliminate the threat of submarines. Thousands of volunteers were also trained to keep track of air activity.

Folks on the home front “did their bit” by collecting scrap and holding “money drives” to help build ships and planes. Victory gardens flourished (Tampa officials estimate 10,000 gardens in their city alone), and people learned to do more with less.

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Love's Allegiance

With most U.S. boys fighting for Uncle Sam in far off countries, Rochelle Addams has given up hope for a wedding in her future. Then she receives an intriguing offer from a distant relative to consider a marriage of convenience.


Conscientious objector Irwin Terrell is looking forward to his assignment at Shady Hills Mental hospital to minister to the less fortunate in lieu of bearing arms. At the arrival of the potential bride his father has selected for him, Irwin’s well-ordered life is turned upside down. And after being left at the altar two years ago, he has no interest in risking romance again.

Despite his best efforts to remain aloof to Rochelle, Irwin is drawn to the enigmatic and beautiful young woman, but will time run out before his wounded heart can find room for her?

Inspired by the biblical love story of Rebekkah and Isaac, Love’s Allegiance explores the struggles and sacrifices of those whose beliefs were at odds with a world at war.


Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/2KCMyke