Thursday, September 17, 2020

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back, Allison Wells

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome back, Allison Wells



Linda:
  Welcome back! It’s such a pleasure to have you visit again. Congratulations on your latest release, Bell of the Night.  What was your inspiration for this story?

Allison: Thank you so much for having me back. It’s always a pleasure. Bell of the Night was inspired by the photos of Mr. EJ Bellocq, who photographed many of the girls in Storyville, New Orleans’ legal red-light district, over 100 years ago. One photograph simply captured my attention and I knew I had to tell her story. (But I will give a warning, many of the photos do depict the ladies in stages of undress, so proceed with caution.)

LM: Research is an important part of writing any book. How did you go about doing research for your story?

Allison: There is a good bit of information about Storyville out there, which was very handy. But there wasn’t much on daily life, so much of that was made up. I looked up the names of actual madams and lawmen of Storyville, incorporating them where I could. I used maps from 1915 to show me the layout of the town and how easy it was for people to come and go to New Orleans. It was a lot of fun, research is always one of my favorite parts of writing a book.

LM: You write fiction and nonfiction. How is your process different for the two genres? The same?

Allison: The only non-fiction I write is in the form of magazine and news articles, so the process is

totally different. For those, I’m usually interviewing people for their expertise or experience, getting direct quotes, and I’m on a much tighter deadline. The hardest part is trying to condense my writing down to under 500 words because I have a space limit. I guess the similarity is that I write better under pressure, so knowing I need to get something done helps me buckle down and finish.

LM: How do you decide what to write about next?

Allison: I get inspired by so many things. A photograph, scripture, a song, a colorful family tall tale. Something will strike me as a story worth telling. I was watching a YouTube video the other day and someone was telling the story of a family member who refused to go west with her husband during the westward expansion - and she shot herself instead of getting in the wagon. I was floored, and I thought it would make a wonderful novel. Maybe one day!

LM: Have you ever struggled with writer’s block? What did you do to overcome it?

Allison: All the time. There are six people in my house and I work from home, so I’m constantly thinking I need to fold laundry or sweep the floor or something else instead of writing. Then I do sit down and nothing happens. The best way to overcome writer’s block, for me, is to spend time in prayer, focus on the story at hand, and just struggle through it. It may come out terrible, but at least I got through it and I can always go back and edit later.

LM: Here are some quickies:

Allison:

Ocean or lake? Lake, all the way.   

Walk, bicycle, or drive? Drive, I need the AC.

Sweet or salty snacks? Ooo, can I mix the two?


LM:
What is your next project?

Allison: I’m currently working on a series of books set in the mid-1800s in South Carolina. The idea was a complete God-send, and He has really been directing my steps with it. I also have been working on a contemporary fiction novel loosely based on the Woman at the Well from John 4.


LM: Where can folks find you on the web?

Allison: All over the place!
Website: http://www.allisonwellswrites.com
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/allisonwellswrites
Instagram: @orangealli
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/orangealli
Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18239522.Allison_Wells

________________________


About Bell of the Night:


Bluebell was sold to Victoria Knight, a well-known Storyville madam, at the tender age of eleven. Now at nineteen, Bell is numbed to her life—until an optimistic preacher named Teddy Sullivan comes to New Orleans, intent on saving the sinful souls of the South.

Teddy is instantly drawn to the petite brunette with sad eyes and longs to rescue her. Bell, however, decides that saving her friends from selling themselves in the Storyville cribs is more important than saving herself. In a fit of selfless desperation, Bell convinces Teddy to marry her best friend, which Teddy agrees to do while cooking up plans of his own.

When a handsome and rich client offers to take Bell from the brothel, Bell thinks all her prayers are finally answered, until she is forced onto the street with nowhere to go.

If Bell isn’t able to see that God loves her regardless of the path her life has taken, and Teddy can’t help Bell get even more of her friends out of Storyville, both risk not only losing sight of God’s plan...but each other.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/3hcvYF3

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Release Day: Love at First Flight

Release Day: Love at First Flight 


I'm excited to announce the release of Love at First Flight. I've been fascinated with the Women's Air Service Pilots since I first learned about them many years ago. I can't imagine what it must be like to fly a plane and admire anyone who can do so. The WASP program lasted less than sixteen months (with the Women's Auxiliary Flying Squadron starting the year before), yet made a great impact on WWII. Freeing men for combat these 1,074 women ferried planes, towed targets, and tested new aircraft. I hope this story honors them, especially the thirty eight who lost their lives in service.



Amazon

Love at First Flight is an Amazon exclusive. You may purchase the book or read it through your KU subscription.

 

Can two people emerge from the clouds of past hurt to find a silver lining of love?

 

Evelyn Reid would rather fly than do anything else, so when war engulfs the U.S., she joins the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. One of the program’s top pilots, she is tapped for pursuit plane training...the dream of a lifetime until she discovers the instructor is her ex-fiancé, Jasper MacPherson.

 

Collecting enough points to rotate stateside, fighter pilot Jasper MacPherson is assigned to teach the WAFS how to fly the army way. Bad enough to be training women, but things take a turn for the worse when his former fiancée shows up as one of his students.

Thursday, September 10, 2020

Talkshow Thursday: Meet Carol James

Talkshow Thursday: Meet Carol James



Linda:
  Thanks for joining me today. Congratulations on the release of your novel Season of Hope. What was your inspiration for the story and why did you choose this particular era to set your story?

Carol: Linda, thanks so much for letting me visit and share about Hope and Josh’s story.

Season of Hope has been ten years in the making. It was the first manuscript I wrote. The plot was born out of the strife, rebellion, and uncertainty of the late nineteen-sixties and early nineteen-seventies (my high school and college years). While, to me, it seemed like a natural era in which to set the story, as I began to pitch the novel to agents and publishers, I quickly learned the Vietnam era was considered no-mans-land. It was not long ago enough to be nostalgic nor recent enough to be contemporary. A wise author friend told me to pack the novel away for a few years and work on other manuscripts while I waited. So, ten years later, I brushed it off, tweaked it, and here it is. Just like Hope, I had to wait for the right season.

LM: The age old question for writers – are you a planner or a pantster,” and what is your favorite part of the writing process?

Carol: Thats a great question. I consider myself a hybrid…a Plantser. I do minimal planning prior to writing. I always choose a Bible verse (or two) and a song as my inspiration. For Season of Hope I chose Song of Songs 2:11-12: 

11 For, lo, the winter is past, the rain is over and gone;

12 The flowers appear on the earth; the time of the singing of birds is come, and the voice of the turtle is hear in our land;

 

And Aaron Keyes’ song Not Guilty Any More for my inspiration.

Once I’ve done that, I design three to four major plot points (usually the beginning, ending, point of commitment, and the black moment). As I write from point to point, I often let the characters lead. And that is my favorite part—being surprised in the direction we go. Sometimes my characters amaze me!

LM: How do you prepare yourself for writing?

Carol: I feel I am always writing—although I might not be putting any words down on paper. I’m always looking for ideas and inspiration. One of my favorite habits is my daily walk with my dog. Our small town park has a lovely walking trail surrounded by trees, flowers, birds, and a flowing stream. As Zoe ambles along and sniffs every inch, it’s the perfect time for me to slow down, too, and think. I can pray over my work. Maybe the surroundings will call up a song I’ve just heard, or a Bible verse I’ve just read. For me, being still mentally in creation stimulates my creativity. Oftentimes I’ll come home from our walks filled with inspiration for my current work or for a future story.

LM: You have several books out. Can you tell us a bit about your journey to publication?

Carol: I would be honored to share. I consider writing my ministry. The idea of writing came into my life in a season of big changes. I knew God was doing a new work in my life, but it took me a while to find out what it was. I never had a desire to be a writer until I read some of Karen Kingsbury’s novels. Her work showed me that Christian authors can, and should, tackle the big issues today’s readers are facing. For Mother’s Day, my oldest daughter took me to one of  Karen’s book signings. I remember standing in line thinking about what to say in the few seconds while she signed my book. When it was our turn, I blurted out, “I just love your books. In fact, your work has encouraged me to start writing. But I’m sure everyone tells you that.”

She shook her head and smiled. “No one’s ever told me that before.”

She was kind and warm and asked me questions about my work and my professional affiliations. Then she wrote a phone number on one of her cards and said, “Tell them Karen told you to call.” It was through her connections, my first novel, Rescuing Faith, was published. And that’s how it all started. An amazing story. Sometimes I still can’t believe it really happened.

LM: Here are some quickies:

Carol:

Favorite childhood book: Little House on the Prairie

Favorite food: Anything Mexican, or chocolate

Favorite vacation place: the English Lake Country

LM: What is your next project?


Carol:
I have a Christmas novella entitled Redeeming Christmas releasing later this year, a new novel releasing in the next year entitled No Longer a Captive, and I am currently writing a novel with the working title of A Time for Singing. It’s the story of a man and woman who are both recovering from heart-breaking rejections and learning to trust and love (themselves and God) again. The two write secret, anonymous letters back and forth, and leave them in the drawers of an old inn. The idea is based on the Secret Drawer Society at Longfellow’s Wayside Inn. My husband and I stayed there a few years ago. When we discovered the drawers filled with letters, I knew I’d include that idea in a novel one day.

LM: Where can folks find you on the web?

Carol:

Website: www.carol-james.com

 

Social media links:

FacebookFacebook.com/CarolJamesAuthor

Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/caroljamesauthor

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/CarolJamesAuth

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/19149238.Carol_James

BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/carol-james

Amazon: https://amzn.to/3duHqKc


 


About Season of Hope:

Hope Stockton’s life is dead, frozen in a winter of guilt, deceit, and fear. When handsome young pastor, Josh Lewis, comes to serve in her church, she wonders if she can trust him with her past. Will he be able to help her answer the questions that have been buried in her heart for years? Or will his own secrets drive them apart and prevent him from helping Hope find her spring of forgiveness?

           

Set in small town Texas in the years during and following the Vietnam war, Season of Hope is a story of forgiveness and restoration.


Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/3bxisuc

Monday, September 7, 2020

The History of Labor Day

 The History of Labor Day

 


Unless you work in the retail industry (which ironically causes the longest working hours for its employees), you’ll have the day off today in honor of Labor Day thanks to the labor movement and President Grover Cleveland. For many, Labor Day means the end of summer, and in non-pandemic times, returning to school. When it was created, the idea was to celebrate the contributions and achievements of American workers.

 

The late 1800s was the height of the Industrial Revolution, an interesting chapter in our country’s history. The period was marked by significant inventions, the development of time saving processes, and great financial success. However, these came at the cost of the average American who worked twelve-hour days and seven-day weeks for a pittance. Child labor was also rampant, with youngsters working in mills, factories, and mines, earning even less than the adults.

 

Manufacturing began to surpass agriculture as a means of employment, and labor unions appeared. As

working conditions worsened, the unions became more vocal, and gained hundreds of thousands of members. Strikes and rallies were organized as a way to protest poor conditions and compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay. Unfortunately, some of these events turned violent, with the Haymarket Riot of 1886 in Chicago being particularly violent.

 


On Tuesday, September 5, 1882, the Central Labor Union held its first Labor Day. In New York City, ten thousand workers marched in a parade from City Hall to Union Square. A picnic, a concert, and speeches marked the event. The second Labor Day was held on September 5, 1883. Several states passed legislation recognizing the day, but Congress wouldn’t legalize the holiday until 1894. The Uniform Monday Holiday Act of 1968 changed several holidays (including Labor Day), to ensure they would always be observed on Mondays so that federal employees could have more three-day weekends.

 

Enjoy your day!

________________________


About Love at First Flight:



Can two people emerge from the clouds of past hurt to find a silver lining of love?

 

Evelyn Reid would rather fly than do anything else, so when war engulfs the U.S., she joins the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. One of the program’s top pilots, she is tapped for pursuit plane training...the dream of a lifetime until she discovers the instructor is her ex-fiancé, Jasper MacPherson.

 

Collecting enough points to rotate stateside, fighter pilot Jasper MacPherson is assigned to teach the WAFS how to fly the army way. Bad enough to be training women, but things take a turn for the worse when his former fiancée shows up as one of his students.


Pre-order Link: https://amzn.to/3jQOMet

 

 

 

Friday, September 4, 2020

Fiction Friday: September New Releases!

 Fiction Friday: September New Releases!


Lots great new Christian and Clean-N-Wholesome books coming out in September. 


Love's Pure Light (Historical Romance, 09/01/20)
: Susanne Dietze, Janine Rosche, Deborah Raney, Shannon McNear: Be transported to unique time periods as you follow a treasured family nativity set through four generations of the Shepherd family. 

Purchase Link






Target for Ransom (Christian Romantic Suspense, 09/01/20): Laura Scott: Can he rescue the daughter he never knew he had?

Purchase Link






Something Worth Doing (Historical Fiction, 09/03/20):
 Jane Kirkpatrick: Based on a true story, a suffragist demonstrates resilience.

Purchase Link







Pam's Christmas Kisses (Contemporary Christian Romance, 09/07/20):
Laura Domino: Love is more than meets the eye.

Purchase Link







Matching Points (Contemporary Christian Romance, 09/09/20):
 Nancy J. Farrier: She doesn't hold his past against him...can he forgive hers?

Purchase Link







Love at First Flight (Historic Romance, 09/15/20):
Linda Shenton Matchett: Can two people emerge from the clouds of past hurt to find a silver lining of love?

Purchase Link







Hiding the Billionaire (Sweet Contemporary Romance, 09/18/20):
Macie St. James: They have it all...except the one thing that matters most.

Purchase Link

Thursday, September 3, 2020

Talkshow Thursday: Meet Christy Distler

Talkshow Thursday: Meet Christy Distler

Linda:  Thanks for joining me today. Congratulations on your book A Cord of Three Strands. The premise is fascinating. Where did you find your inspiration for the story?

CHRISTY: Thank you so much, and thank you for hosting me, Linda! My inspiration actually came from a dream. I know, cliché, right? But it’s true. Years ago I was working on the genealogy of my maternal grandmother’s family and came across a name—Seneca Lukens—that made me question the family’s connection to the Seneca tribe. That night Isaac Lukens—a man born to a French trader and a Lenape woman—showed up in a dream. From there I started writing his story, and it ended up intertwining with historical happenings and people.

LM: Research is an important part of the writing process. What sort of research did you do for A Cord of Three Strands? Did you unearth anything that was totally unexpected that you knew you had to include?

CHRISTY: ACTS required sooo much research. I had some general knowledge already since I love historical fiction and I attended Horsham Friends Meeting (the Quaker meeting in the book) for a couple of years when I was a young adult. That said, a lot of research was still necessary, especially since all the places in the story, as well as several people and the Friendly Association (the group of Philadelphia Quakers who attempted to act as a liaison between Pennsylvania and its Indian tribes) aren’t fictional. But I love research, so I didn’t mind it.

As far as unearthing something unexpected, yes—two things, actually. The first was the Friendly Association. I didn’t know about that until I started researching, and when I learned the group formed at exactly the time the book was set, I knew I had to include it. The other thing I learned didn’t end up in the book, but it gave me some real insight into what life was like in the eighteenth century. About a year after ACTS’s prologue takes place, Gwynedd Friends Meeting (the nearest meeting to Horsham) was hit by an epidemic, probably diphtheria, that took the lives of about sixty of the children—almost that entire generation—in two months’ time. Just inconceivable. Several of the children were cousins to my ancestors, and I’d love to find a way to somehow write a tribute to those children and their families. But wow, what an emotionally intense undertaking that would be.

LM:  What is your favorite part of the writing process?

CHRISTY: For ACTS, seeing it all come together in the end. I didn’t plot this novel like I did the one I’m working on right now, so seeing the way everything fell into place just perfectly (in my eyes, anyway) just amazed me. Of course, I know better than to take credit for that. God planted this story in my heart, and even though I tended it, he caused it to grow.

LM: You are a professional editor in addition to being a novelist. How do you balance the two roles? Is it difficult to turn off your internal editor as you’re drafting?

CHRISTY: It’s definitely a balancing act. Editing is a more right-brained activity while writing is more left-brained, and switching from one to the other on the fly doesn’t always go smoothly for me. I’ve found it’s best to set aside days for just writing (not editing my work or anyone else’s). Turning off the internal editor can be difficult too, which is why I’m probably one of the slowest writers I know. I tell my authors to get the story down on paper and worry about the more challenging details later, but I’m not so good at taking my own advice with this. I’m working on that. 😊

LM: What has been the most challenging part of the road to publication for you? What advice do you have for fledgling writers?

CHRISTY: The most challenging part for me has been believing I’m a “good-enough” writer. A lot of authors deal with some degree of impostor syndrome (doubting your talents or accomplishments), and that was the biggest hurdle for me. I love writing fiction so much that I could be happy writing only because I enjoy it, but then I came to the realization that, no matter my doubts, God has called me to write stories that bring glory to him, and that by not sharing them with others, I’m not being obedient. My deepest desire is to be obedient to him, so I had to get out of my own way and let him lead.

My advice: Ask God’s blessing and direction as you write, and study fiction craft. And enjoy the ride!

LM: Here are some quickies:

CHRISTY:

Favorite season: I love spring. I love fall too, but fall leads to winter, so spring wins.
Favorite vacation spot: Brant Beach, New Jersey
Favorite place to write: On the couch, with my dogs next to me.

LM: What is your next project?

CHRISTY: I’m almost finished a novel that checks two of the boxes on my (now defunct) Things I’ll Never Write list: romance and Amish—although it’s not really Amish since it takes place in an Old Order Mennonite community. It’s a pretty big jump from historical fiction, but I still have the Plain community connection. I also plan to do more with the Lukens family. Several of my ancestors were involved with the Underground Railroad, and I’d love to bring their stories to light.

LM: Where can folks find you on the web?

CHRISTY:
Website: https://christydistler.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ChristyDistlerAuthor
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christydistlerauthor/
Twitter: https://twitter.com/christydistler
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/christydistler/a-cord-of-three-strands/
BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/christy-distler
Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/335328.Christy_Distler


___________________________

About A Cord of Three Strands:
Born to a French trader and a Lenape woman. Reared by Quakers. As the French & Indian War rages, one man strives for peace—between Pennsylvania and its Indian tribes, and between his own heart and mind.

As 1756 dawns, Isaac Lukens leaves the Pennsylvania wilderness after two years with the Lenape people. He’s failed to find the families of his birth parents, a French trader and a Lenape woman. Worse, the tribe he’s lived with, having rejected his peacemaking efforts, now ravages frontier settlements in retaliation. When he arrives in the Quaker community where he was reared, questions taunt him: Who is he—white man or Lenape? And where does he belong?

Elisabeth Alden, Isaac’s dearest childhood friend, is left to tend her young siblings alone upon her father’s death. Despite Isaac’s promise to care for her and the children, she battles resentment toward him for having left, while an unspeakable tragedy and her discordant courtship with a prominent Philadelphian weigh on her as well.

Elisabeth must marry or lose guardianship of her siblings, and her options threaten the life with her and the children that Isaac has come to love. Face with Elisabeth’s hesitancy to marry, the prospect of finding his family at last, and the opportunity to assist in the peace process between Pennsylvania and its Indian tribes, Isaac must determine where—and to whom—the Almighty has called him.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Traveling Tuesday: Sweetwater, Texas

Traveling Tuesday: Sweetwater, Texas


The second largest U.S. state by both area (after Alaska) and population (after California), Texas is also larger than many countries. At 268,820 square miles, the state is almost twice as large as Germany or Japan and over twice the size of the United Kingdom. Its fascinating history includes ownership by Spain and France as well as being a member of both the United States and the Confederate States. For nearly ten years, Texas was also a republic having gained its independence from Mexico after the Texas Revolution.

On December 29, 1845 Texas was admitted at the twenty-eighth state. As a result, Mexico broke off diplomatic relations with the U.S., and a boundary dispute went one for three years. The population was a strong mix of English-speaking settlers and Spanish-speaking former Mexicans. New settlers streamed into the state, many bringing their slaves. It wasn’t long before the beef industry took hold, with cattle being shipped all over the U.S. and Caribbean. The cotton, timber, and oil industries also created a strong economy within the state.

Nestled in the north central part of the state, the small town of Sweetwater sprouted. They received a post office in 1879, and the Texas and Pacific Railway started service two years later. To increase railroad traffic, the town built a town lake in 1898, then three more in subsequent years. The Kansas City, Mexico and Orient Railway began construction in 1903. Sweetwater became a railroad town with businesses and homes clustering along the rail lines.

As with many towns across the U.S. during World War II, Sweetwater’s population increased dramatically, more than doubling in large part to Avenger Field (named in a contest won by a Mrs. Grace Faver). Covering nearly 900 acres, the field began as the Sweetwater Municipal Airport in the 1920s. A small flight school operated using WWI surplus planes. In August 1941, the Army Air Force took over and created a training base. The flight school was taken over by the Plosser-Prince Air Academy who was contracted by the Royal Canadian Air Force to train British and American volunteer pilots.

One class of British Royal Air Force pilots was trained before the field was converted for training American women pilots: Jacqueline Cochran’s Women Air Service Pilots (WASP). The private flying school was closed in August 1942, and the base became a formal Army Air Force military installation to be used by the Air Transport Command as a transition school for experienced single-engine pilots. The graduates would be certified on twin-engine planes before being sent overseas. Ultimately, the men were moved to other locations and the base solely used for the WASP program.

The program disbanded in December 1944, and at the end of the war the military turned over the airport to local government for civil use. Pilots can still land at Avenger field at the Sweetwater Airport. Located on fifty acres of leased land, the National WASP WWII Museum opened in 2005, with a grand opening held on May 28, the same day the first class of WASP graduated in 1943.

_______________________

Love at First Flight: A WWII Romance 

Can two people emerge from the clouds of past hurt to find a silver lining of love?

Evelyn Reid would rather fly than do anything else, so when war engulfs the U.S., she joins the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. One of the program’s top pilots, she is tapped for pursuit plane training...the dream of a lifetime until she discovers the instructor is her ex-fiancé, Jasper MacPherson.

Collecting enough points to rotate stateside, fighter pilot Jasper MacPherson is assigned to teach the WAFS how to fly the army way. Bad enough to be training women, but things take a turn for the worse when his former fiancée shows up as one of his students.

Releasing on September 15, 2020 on Kindle, Kindle Unlimited, and Paperback.


Thursday, August 27, 2020

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome Back Theresa Lynn Hall

Talkshow Thursday: Welcome Back Theresa Lynn Hall

Linda:  Welcome back! Thanks for joining me today. Congratulations on your debut Love Inspired Suspense novel Accidental Target. It sounds intriguing. What was your inspiration for the story?
Theresa: Thank you so much for having me, Linda.
I’m a pantser, so when I started the story it began with the idea of what would happen if someone was involved in a car accident and suddenly became the target of a killer. I think I was watching the news when I came up with it. From there, the characters began to take over.  
LM: Getting a book accepted by Love Inspired is a big accomplishment. How did the opportunity come about?
Theresa: I just so happened to be on Facebook and saw a post by Emily Rodmell announcing The Great Love Inspired Author Search. I was working on a suspense and had the first six chapters written, so I decided to enter for feedback. I never dreamed I would end up with a contract! I polished up the first three chapters, wrote a synopsis, and a query letter, then sent it off. In the meantime, I continued writing the book. After I got the request for the full, I started to get really nervous. Emily Rodmell was the editor who received my submission and she gave me edits to do based on those first three chapters. After getting “The Call” I still had more edits to do, but Emily’s ideas really brought the story together. Even if I hadn’t been offered a contract, just getting the chance to work with her and learn from her has made me a better writer.
LM: With your son in law enforcement, you’ve got a ready-made subject matter expert close at hand. What other research did you conduct for your story?
Theresa: I also have a son who is a volunteer firefighter and we have several other police officers in the family, so I’m very fortunate to have plenty of experts I can reach out to for help. Some of my research also came from reading articles online, books about law enforcement, listening to podcasts and watching lots of YouTube videos. I watched a video on how to escape zip-ties to help me with a scene in the book. Great knowledge to have but I hope I never need it in real life!
LM: How do you decide where to set your stories?
Theresa: I’m a native Texan, and Texas is a BIG state. There’s literally every type of landscape you can imagine here. I like setting my books in fictitious Texas towns that resemble real towns.
LM: If money were no object, where would you vacation?
Theresa: Oh, that’s an easy one! I would travel to Scotland and visit a real castle. Many years ago, I researched my dad’s family, and with the help of relatives, traced it back to 16th century Scotland. I’ve wanted to visit there ever since.

LM: Quickies:
Theresa: Favorite Childhood book: The Little House on the Prairie series
Favorite food: Mexican food
Favorite way to spend a day off: Writing (because I’m a full-time teacher.)
 LM: What is your next project?
Theresa: I’ve got a couple of them, but one I’m working on right now is about a serial killer who is tormenting a female police officer. Although, she’s pretty tough and she doesn’t scare easily. It’s fun writing about a female character who can handle herself in just about any situation.  She also has a handsome Texas Ranger helping her hunt down the killer. It will be interesting to see how they pull it off!
LM: Where can folks find you on the web?
Theresa: I have a website at www.theresalynnhall.com and I’m on Facebook at www.facebook.com/theresahallauthor. I also have other social media accounts listed on my website. I also blog to help promote other Christian authors.




_____________________
About Accidental Target:

On an icy road in the dead of night what she sees might get her killed.
Allison Moore can't deny what she sees—a lifeless hand sticking out of a tarp in the back of a crashed pickup truck. Seconds later, she's on the run with a murderer on her heels. Nowhere is safe and no one can be trusted...except police sergeant Jackson Archer. But with someone set on silencing her, can Jackson keep his promise of protection?
Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/32cRVQg

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Traveling Tuesday: Missouri


Traveling Tuesday: Missouri


Located in the Midwestern United States, Missouri’s history hearkens back several hundred years with the Osage and Missouria Native American tribes. The state is bordered by eight states: Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska. With the Ozark Mountains, Missouri and Mississippi Rivers, and large forests, the geography is rich in flora and fauna. In 1764, the fur trade was found by Frenchmen Pierre Laclede and his stepson Auguste Chouteau. Three years later the Spanish arrived.

St. Louis became the center of a regional fur trade with Native American tribes that extended along the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and dominated the economy for decades. The rivers were used to ship the furs down to New Orleans for export to Europe. The industry and the associated businesses made St. Louis a financial center and saw a large influx of wealth and luxury items. Shipment of agriculture products also created a boom in the economy, and the invention of the steamboat increased river trade even more.

Photo: balancedspirit/
Pixabay
Acquired during the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, Missouri became known as the Gateway to the West because it served as a departure point for many expeditions, including the Lewis and Clark Expedition. The Oregon, Santa Fe, and California trails all began in Missouri, and the Pony Express got its start in Missouri.

After the territory was admitted as a slave state in 1821 (as per the Missouri Compromise), many of the early settlers migrated from the south and brought slaves with them. A decade later, Mormons and Canadians began to arrive, and conflicts were common. The Mormon War erupted in 1838, and the following year an “Extermination Order” was passed, and the Mormons were expelled, and their lands confiscated. Tensions over slavery continued, and the population exploded.

Many of the newcomers were Irish and German immigrants and found themselves on opposing sides of the slavery issue. Missouri voted to remain within the Union, however, a pro-Confederate group of politicians fled to the southern part of the state and voted to secede. However, as they never controlled any part of the state, the act was merely symbolic.  The state was the location of nearly fifty battles during the Civil War.

The expansion of the railroad and the Texas cattle industry after the war, made Kansas a major meatpacking center. By the time World War II arrived, Missouri had transition from a rural economy to that of a mixed agricultural-service-industrial economy. Multiple military bases and Prisoner-of-War camps were constructed around the state, and almost 450,000 Missourians served in the military. Defense industry plants sprang up such as Lake City Army Ammunition Plant, Pratt & Whitney (engines), North American Aviation (bombers), Westinghouse, and Bendix Aviation.

Perhaps most memorable is that the USS Missouri was the last battleship commissioned by the US, and was the site of the surrender of the Empire of Japan which ended WWII. Some well-known Missourians include Chuck Berry, Walt Disney, Edwin Hubble, Harry S. Truman, and Mark Twain.

Have you ever visited the Show Me State?

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Will she have to run from the past for the rest of her life?

Dinah Simpkins has no chance of making a good marriage. Her outlaw brothers and her father’s gambling addiction have ruined the family’s reputation. Then the Westward Home and Hearts Matrimonial Agency provides an opportunity for a fresh start. After Dinah arrives in Nebraska, she discovers her brothers played a part in the death of her prospective groom’s first wife.

As a former Pinkerton detective Nathan Childs knows when someone is lying. The bride sent by the matrimonial agency may be beautiful, but she’s definitely hiding something, and he has no intention of marrying her until he uncovers the truth. But an easier solution may be to send her packing. Then his young daughter goes missing. He and Dinah must put aside their mutual hurt and mistrust to find her.

An exciting addition to the “Westward Home & Hearts” series, this story is a Christian western romance. Easily read as a stand-alone.

Purchase Link: https://amzn.to/3aOFLiS